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Do you ever wonder about your cat’s sleeping habits and patterns, or how they manage to sleep anywhere, anytime? Cats are crepuscular, which means that they’re most active during dawn and dusk. They can get up to 16 hours of sleep a day (fun fact: they sleep more than dogs!) and are often snoozing, going in and out of light sleep and deeper sleep, but quick to awaken.

From our resident blogger, Joy:

When I was growing up, we had a black and white cat named Pepe, who would, every evening as my parents prepared dinner, sprint from beneath the couch in the dining room, through the kitchen, around the counter, and into the hallway. She did it religiously and almost always at the same time, as if she had a clock set to remind her. It always baffled me, and to this day, I can hear the sound of her little paws padding quickly on the floor. Now I understand it was always during her burst of energy at dusk! Perhaps she was playing out an elaborate fantasy where a mouse scampered from room to room, and capturing it was her only chance of survival.

Why exactly do cats sleep so much? The answer lies in genetics and evolution. Feline predators (and prey — more on that later!) sleep for long periods of time to reserve their energy; after all, hunting is both physically and mentally demanding — so much so that they need to be fully rested to be the agile, quick and cunning hunters that they are. Interestingly, cats are dreamers — that is, they enter a REM sleep similar to humans and can be seen twitching their whiskers or flicking their tail during their deepest slumber.

While cats are some of the most expert nappers, it’s good practice to be aware of your furry pal’s sleeping habits and be watchful of any changes or behavior that strikes you as odd; it could be a sign of illness or pain.